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OIP

Optical Image Profiler


Log Relative Distribution of NAPL Level Fuels and Oils with Depth in Soil

The OIP (Optical Image Profiler) is a direct push tool used for the delineation of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) hydrocarbon fuels and oils. The OIP-UV probe is designed with UV and visible light sources which are directed out a sapphire window. As the probe is advanced into the subsurface, the UV light source will induce fluorescence of the fuel polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This fluorescence is captured by an onboard camera which operates at 30 images per second. Images are saved throughout the advancement of the log and still photos are taken using UV and visible light sources each rod addition as well as at operator chosen depths. Soil fluorescence images (20 per ft) are saved throughout the log and can be reviewed in Direct Image Viewer after the log is complete. The OIP-G is available for heavier fuel or oil products.

OIP-UV Probe

OIP Overview



What is Geoprobe® Direct Image® OIP?

Graphs (left to right):soil electrical conductivity, fuel fluorescence, depth specific image of fluorescence

Typical OIP-UV Log: Graphs (left to right):soil electrical conductivity, fuel fluorescence, depth specific image of fluorescence

OIP is a logging tool that uses real time analysis of fluorescence images to map position and relative concentration of non-aqueous phase hydrocarbons.  Images are saved (20 per foot) in the log for later review and confirmation.  

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Principles of Operation

The OIP-UV is a tool for mapping light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL), residual LNAPL, and light oils. The OIP-UV system utilizes a 275nm ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diode (LED) to produce fluorescence from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contained in fuels and light oils.   The UV light is directed out a sapphire window in the side of the probe (Figure 1) onto the soil.   When LNAPL level fuels are present, the PAH molecules will absorb the UV light energy and shortly afterwards emit a light photon (fluorophore) which is the resultant fluorescence.  Directly behind the sapphire window, the onboard camera captures images of the soil and any fluorescence produced by hydrocarbon contaminants present.  The acquisition software analyzes each pixel of the images taken for the presence of color typical of fuel fluorescence.  If there is no fuel present in the formation, or it is not in high enough concentration, then the returned camera image will appear black or dark under the UV light source.  The OIP acquisition software logs percent area fluorescence with depth.  The OIP-UV probe contains a visible as well as UV LEDs.   The visible images are useful for determination of soil color, texture and occasionally confirming the presence of fuel or oil LNAPL globules. 

OIP-UV Probe Schematic

Figure 1: OIP-UV Probe Schematic

The camera within the OIP probe operates at 30 frames per second with the log % area fluorescence (%AF) value being an average of all the images taken over a 0.05ft (1.5cm) interval.  As the log is reviewed in Direct Image Viewer, the user can click on the log and a green line will show up across the log which corresponds to a specific depth.  The image saved from that depth will display if the OIP Image Display graph is shown.  In Figure 2 the depth of the displayed saved image is 24.20ft, it is a UV image with the actual image being displayed in the "captured" image section.  The "analyzed" image indicates which pixels whithin the image display fluorescent color consitent with the color expected for fuel fluorescence.  There are 2 colors that may show up in the analyzed image: red which corresponds to the darker blue colors of the image and green which corresponds to areas of high brightesteness etiher due to very low color saturation or high brightness of the image.  This is used in an attempt to isolate out possible false mineral fluorescence. The overlayed image takes both the captured image and analyzed image and overlays them so the operator can identify areas that are being counted as fluorescence.  Images are saved as the probe is moving for every 0.05ft. The red dots on the right side column of the image display graph are depths that "Still Images" were taken.  This will contain both UV and visible light still images on the OIP-UV probe.  The OIP-G probe takes images using a 520nm green laser diode and an infrared LED.

OIP Fluorescence Log with Depth Specific Image and Software Image Analysis

Figure 2: OIP Fluorescence Log with Depth Specific Image and Software Image Analysis

The OIP system software saves 20 images per foot (65 per meter), an example portion of the saved images that an OIP-UV log would contain is shown in Figure 3.  These images are saved as the OIP-UV probe is advanced into the subsurface with a typical OIP log containing hundreds of images and being a few hundred mb in size depending upon terminal log depth and amount of color present in the images.  Where there is no NAPL or residual NAPL present the images are black, where hydrocarbon NAPL is present blue fluorescence is seen within the images.

Saved images from an OIP-UV log

Figure 3: Saved images from an OIP-UV log

Example Logs

The OIHPT-UV Log in Figure 4 displays the following graphs (left to right) electrical conductivity, HPT injection pressure, OIP % image area fluorescence, depth specific saved image (captured), the software accepted area of fluorescence (analyzed) of the saved image.  The red dots on the  right side column indicate locations of still UV and visible images saved in the file.

OIHPT-UV Log

Figure 4: OIHPT-UV Log

The OIP-G log in Figure 5 was performed on a creosote site in Europe.  The OIP-G probe which induces fluorescence utilizing a 520nm green laser diode (LD) returns a fluorescence image in the orange-red color range as depicted in the analyzed image from 54.10ft in the right column of the log.  The red dots are the saved still images which are taken with the 520nm green LD and an infrared (IR) LED.

OIP-G Log

Figure 5: OIP-G Log

When the probe is stopped to add rods, still images will be captured with both available light sources in the OIP probe.  Still images can be captured at any time an operator desires by stopping the probe advancement and selecting a button in the software.  The process only takes a few seconds to complete and probe advancement can resume.  These still images provide greater image clarity and an opportunity to look at the soil and fuel under visible light.   Visible images provide the investigator an opportunity to observe soil color and texture in-situ.  Occasionally when hydrocarbon NAPL is present in a saturated sand formation NAPL globules are evident in both the UV and visible images (Figure 6).

Collocated UV and Visible Still Images

Figure 6: Collocated UV and Visible Still Images

DI Viewer is a free program downloadable from the link below which allows the user to display any of the Direct Image® log types (MIP, OIP, HPT, EC).  With this program the user can display the raw data .zip files of each saved graph of an individual log in single log view or compare them to other logs using the overlay and cross sectional view functions.  Log specific QA data is also accessible with this software which also allows one to print or export the logs data for 3D modeling or into .jpg or .png files.

> DI Viewer Download Page

Tooling & Instrumentation


OIHPT Equipment

Geoprobe Systems® manufactures all of the equipment needed for OIHPT logging. This equipment can be divided into two basic categories: surface instrumentation (OIP interface, data acquisition, and HPT controller), and downhole probes (including probes, trunklines, connectors, etc.).

A basic set of OIHPT instruments is shown in Figure 7 and includes the following:

  1. OP6100 OIP Interface: This instrument regulates, controls and monitors power to the OIP power supply and sends the system control signals to the downhole tools.  Images from the down hole camera are collected by the instrumnet and relayed to the computer via a USB connection.
  2. FI6000: Data acquisition instrument, acquires depth, EC, and HPT data if avilable and relays it to the computer via a USB connection. The FI6000 is the general data acquisition instrument used in all Geoprobe® DI logging systems (EC and HPT). It also provides the electrical conductivity measurement system associated with OIP.
  3. K6300 Series HPT Controller (Optional): This instrument regulates and measures injection water flow and pressure to the OIHPT probe.  Data from this controller is sent to the FI6000 via a data cable.
OIHPT Instrumentation

Figure 7: OIHPT Instrumentation

Basic downhole OIP equipment is shown in Figure 8. There are many variations and combinations of this tooling, depending on the contaminant type, depth requirement and the lithology or permeability sensors that are to be used in combination with the OIP. The standard, most commonly deployed components are shown below:
1. OH6570 OIHPT-UV probe (MN 227466) 275nm UV and visible light sources with removable sapphire window, HPT screen and dipole electrical conductivity array.  
2. OIHPT Trunkline (MN 228254)/OIP Trunkline (MN 226362): 150 ft. (46m).
3. Connection section and drive head. Power supply (OIP-UV MN 224692, OIHPT-UV MN 228265) and electrical connections are carried in this section.
4. Probe rods. Geoprobe® 1.75-inch (44mm) and 1.5-inch (38mm) rods are the most commonly used for MIP logging.  Successive sections of these rods are added to push or percussion drive the probe to depth.
 

OIHPT Probe, Power supply (ran inside the connection tube), connection tube and drive head which connect the the drive rods.  The OIHPT trunkline connects the down-hole probe to the up-hole instruments.

Figure 8: OIHPT Probe, Power supply (ran inside the connection tube), connection tube and drive head which connect the the drive rods. The OIHPT trunkline connects the down-hole probe to the up-hole instruments.

Having HPT data along with the OIP-EC data provides the site investigator a powerful combination of logging tools.  This tool provides the ability to simultaneously estimate soil permeability with the HPT, detect NAPL fluorescence with the OIP, and measure soil/pore fluid conductance with standard EC.  The OIHPT probe and system can be operated with all sensors collecting data or it can be used to collect just HPT-EC data or just OIP-EC data depending upon project and weather considerations.

> Learn More: HPT

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OIHPT-G

OIHPT-G probe utilizes a 520nm green laser diode to induce fluorescence on larger PAH contaminants such as Creosote, Coal Tars, Heavy Crude Oils and Bunker Fuels.  

OIHPT-G with a Green Light Source:

OIP-G Fluorescence Image:


OIHPT-CPT

This OIHPT-CPT sub allows an operator to collect HPT injection pressure, OIP fuel fluorescence, and EC lithology along with CPT tip resistance, sleeve friction and U2 pore pressure when combined with the Nova cone.  The tool can be operated without the NOVA cone by running with the thread solid point or with the NOVA cone by substituting the solid point with the NOVA cone.   The OIHPT CPT sub is available in either ultraviolet-visible or green-infrared light source models depending upon the target contaminant requirements. 

> Learn More: CPT

Used with the Geotech AB NOVA Cone

OIHPT-CPT Sub : Used with the Geotech AB NOVA Cone

 

 

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Specifications


FAQ's


Purchasing a System


> Download SOP

OIP

Optical Image Profiler

OIP Log

OIP Log

OIP Logging in Belgium

OIP Logging in Belgium

OIP Logging in New York

OIP Logging in New York

OIHPT Instruments and Probe

OIHPT Instruments and Probe

OIHPT Log

OIHPT Log

UV Image of NAPL

UV Image of NAPL

OIHPT Logging in Alaska

OIHPT Logging in Alaska

Visible Image of Soil

Visible Image of Soil

OIP Log
OIP Logging in Belgium
OIP Logging in New York
OIHPT Instruments and Probe
OIHPT Log
UV Image of NAPL
OIHPT Logging in Alaska
Visible Image of Soil

Log Relative Distribution of NAPL Level Fuels and Oils with Depth in Soil

The OIP (Optical Image Profiler) is a direct push tool used for the delineation of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) hydrocarbon fuels and oils. The OIP-UV probe is designed with UV and visible light sources which are directed out a sapphire window. As the probe is advanced into the subsurface, the UV light source will induce fluorescence of the fuel polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This fluorescence is captured by an onboard camera which operates at 30 images per second. Images are saved throughout the advancement of the log and still photos are taken using UV and visible light sources each rod addition as well as at operator chosen depths. Soil fluorescence images (20 per ft) are saved throughout the log and can be reviewed in Direct Image Viewer after the log is complete. The OIP-G is available for heavier fuel or oil products.

❯ Contact Us

> Download SOP

OIP

Optical Image Profiler


Log Relative Distribution of NAPL Level Fuels and Oils with Depth in Soil

The OIP (Optical Image Profiler) is a direct push tool used for the delineation of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) hydrocarbon fuels and oils. The OIP-UV probe is designed with UV and visible light sources which are directed out a sapphire window. As the probe is advanced into the subsurface, the UV light source will induce fluorescence of the fuel polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This fluorescence is captured by an onboard camera which operates at 30 images per second. Images are saved throughout the advancement of the log and still photos are taken using UV and visible light sources each rod addition as well as at operator chosen depths. Soil fluorescence images (20 per ft) are saved throughout the log and can be reviewed in Direct Image Viewer after the log is complete. The OIP-G is available for heavier fuel or oil products.

❯ Contact Us

.

OIP Overview

Click on a section below to learn more about OIP.

OIP-UV Probe

What is Geoprobe® Direct Image® OIP?

  • OIP produces a detailed log of induced fuel fluorescence.
  • A downhole camera operates at 30 frames per second (fps) to capture fuel fluorescence.
  • The acquisition software analyzes each image for typical fuel fluorescence color.
  • The results are the percent of the image area (up to 100%) that displays fuel fluorescence.
  • Fluorescence images are saved in the log every 0.05ft (15mm) for review at a later time.
  • OIP is simple to learn and operate.
  • OIP log Interpretation is intuitive, made simple by the saved images to compare to the log.
  • The OIHPT-UV probe contains both 275nm UV and visible LEDs.
  • The OIHPT-G probe contains both 520nm LD and infrared LEDs.
  • Able to automatically and manually capture visible soil images.
  • Collect OIP fluorescence and EC data with optional probe configurations that include HPT or CPT data.
Graphs (left to right):soil electrical conductivity, fuel fluorescence, depth specific image of fluorescence

Typical OIP-UV Log: Graphs (left to right):soil electrical conductivity, fuel fluorescence, depth specific image of fluorescence

OIP is a logging tool that uses real time analysis of fluorescence images to map position and relative concentration of non-aqueous phase hydrocarbons.  Images are saved (20 per foot) in the log for later review and confirmation.  

The OIP-UV is a tool for mapping light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL), residual LNAPL, and light oils. The OIP-UV system utilizes a 275nm ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diode (LED) to produce fluorescence from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contained in fuels and light oils.   The UV light is directed out a sapphire window in the side of the probe (Figure 1) onto the soil.   When LNAPL level fuels are present, the PAH molecules will absorb the UV light energy and shortly afterwards emit a light photon (fluorophore) which is the resultant fluorescence.  Directly behind the sapphire window, the onboard camera captures images of the soil and any fluorescence produced by hydrocarbon contaminants present.  The acquisition software analyzes each pixel of the images taken for the presence of color typical of fuel fluorescence.  If there is no fuel present in the formation, or it is not in high enough concentration, then the returned camera image will appear black or dark under the UV light source.  The OIP acquisition software logs percent area fluorescence with depth.  The OIP-UV probe contains a visible as well as UV LEDs.   The visible images are useful for determination of soil color, texture and occasionally confirming the presence of fuel or oil LNAPL globules. 

OIP-UV Probe Schematic

Figure 1: OIP-UV Probe Schematic

The camera within the OIP probe operates at 30 frames per second with the log % area fluorescence (%AF) value being an average of all the images taken over a 0.05ft (1.5cm) interval.  As the log is reviewed in Direct Image Viewer, the user can click on the log and a green line will show up across the log which corresponds to a specific depth.  The image saved from that depth will display if the OIP Image Display graph is shown.  In Figure 2 the depth of the displayed saved image is 24.20ft, it is a UV image with the actual image being displayed in the "captured" image section.  The "analyzed" image indicates which pixels whithin the image display fluorescent color consitent with the color expected for fuel fluorescence.  There are 2 colors that may show up in the analyzed image: red which corresponds to the darker blue colors of the image and green which corresponds to areas of high brightesteness etiher due to very low color saturation or high brightness of the image.  This is used in an attempt to isolate out possible false mineral fluorescence. The overlayed image takes both the captured image and analyzed image and overlays them so the operator can identify areas that are being counted as fluorescence.  Images are saved as the probe is moving for every 0.05ft. The red dots on the right side column of the image display graph are depths that "Still Images" were taken.  This will contain both UV and visible light still images on the OIP-UV probe.  The OIP-G probe takes images using a 520nm green laser diode and an infrared LED.

OIP Fluorescence Log with Depth Specific Image and Software Image Analysis

Figure 2: OIP Fluorescence Log with Depth Specific Image and Software Image Analysis

The OIP system software saves 20 images per foot (65 per meter), an example portion of the saved images that an OIP-UV log would contain is shown in Figure 3.  These images are saved as the OIP-UV probe is advanced into the subsurface with a typical OIP log containing hundreds of images and being a few hundred mb in size depending upon terminal log depth and amount of color present in the images.  Where there is no NAPL or residual NAPL present the images are black, where hydrocarbon NAPL is present blue fluorescence is seen within the images.

Saved images from an OIP-UV log

Figure 3: Saved images from an OIP-UV log

The OIHPT-UV Log in Figure 4 displays the following graphs (left to right) electrical conductivity, HPT injection pressure, OIP % image area fluorescence, depth specific saved image (captured), the software accepted area of fluorescence (analyzed) of the saved image.  The red dots on the  right side column indicate locations of still UV and visible images saved in the file.

OIHPT-UV Log

Figure 4: OIHPT-UV Log

The OIP-G log in Figure 5 was performed on a creosote site in Europe.  The OIP-G probe which induces fluorescence utilizing a 520nm green laser diode (LD) returns a fluorescence image in the orange-red color range as depicted in the analyzed image from 54.10ft in the right column of the log.  The red dots are the saved still images which are taken with the 520nm green LD and an infrared (IR) LED.

OIP-G Log

Figure 5: OIP-G Log

When the probe is stopped to add rods, still images will be captured with both available light sources in the OIP probe.  Still images can be captured at any time an operator desires by stopping the probe advancement and selecting a button in the software.  The process only takes a few seconds to complete and probe advancement can resume.  These still images provide greater image clarity and an opportunity to look at the soil and fuel under visible light.   Visible images provide the investigator an opportunity to observe soil color and texture in-situ.  Occasionally when hydrocarbon NAPL is present in a saturated sand formation NAPL globules are evident in both the UV and visible images (Figure 6).

Collocated UV and Visible Still Images

Figure 6: Collocated UV and Visible Still Images

DI Viewer is a free program downloadable from the link below which allows the user to display any of the Direct Image® log types (MIP, OIP, HPT, EC).  With this program the user can display the raw data .zip files of each saved graph of an individual log in single log view or compare them to other logs using the overlay and cross sectional view functions.  Log specific QA data is also accessible with this software which also allows one to print or export the logs data for 3D modeling or into .jpg or .png files.

> DI Viewer Download Page

OIP Vertical

OIP Overview


OIP-UV Probe

What is Geoprobe® Direct Image® OIP?

  • OIP produces a detailed log of induced fuel fluorescence.
  • A downhole camera operates at 30 frames per second (fps) to capture fuel fluorescence.
  • The acquisition software analyzes each image for typical fuel fluorescence color.
  • The results are the percent of the image area (up to 100%) that displays fuel fluorescence.
  • Fluorescence images are saved in the log every 0.05ft (15mm) for review at a later time.
  • OIP is simple to learn and operate.
  • OIP log Interpretation is intuitive, made simple by the saved images to compare to the log.
  • The OIHPT-UV probe contains both 275nm UV and visible LEDs.
  • The OIHPT-G probe contains both 520nm LD and infrared LEDs.
  • Able to automatically and manually capture visible soil images.
  • Collect OIP fluorescence and EC data with optional probe configurations that include HPT or CPT data.
Graphs (left to right):soil electrical conductivity, fuel fluorescence, depth specific image of fluorescence

Typical OIP-UV Log: Graphs (left to right):soil electrical conductivity, fuel fluorescence, depth specific image of fluorescence

OIP is a logging tool that uses real time analysis of fluorescence images to map position and relative concentration of non-aqueous phase hydrocarbons.  Images are saved (20 per foot) in the log for later review and confirmation.  

Principles of Operation


The OIP-UV is a tool for mapping light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL), residual LNAPL, and light oils. The OIP-UV system utilizes a 275nm ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diode (LED) to produce fluorescence from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contained in fuels and light oils.   The UV light is directed out a sapphire window in the side of the probe (Figure 1) onto the soil.   When LNAPL level fuels are present, the PAH molecules will absorb the UV light energy and shortly afterwards emit a light photon (fluorophore) which is the resultant fluorescence.  Directly behind the sapphire window, the onboard camera captures images of the soil and any fluorescence produced by hydrocarbon contaminants present.  The acquisition software analyzes each pixel of the images taken for the presence of color typical of fuel fluorescence.  If there is no fuel present in the formation, or it is not in high enough concentration, then the returned camera image will appear black or dark under the UV light source.  The OIP acquisition software logs percent area fluorescence with depth.  The OIP-UV probe contains a visible as well as UV LEDs.   The visible images are useful for determination of soil color, texture and occasionally confirming the presence of fuel or oil LNAPL globules. 

OIP-UV Probe Schematic

Figure 1: OIP-UV Probe Schematic

The camera within the OIP probe operates at 30 frames per second with the log % area fluorescence (%AF) value being an average of all the images taken over a 0.05ft (1.5cm) interval.  As the log is reviewed in Direct Image Viewer, the user can click on the log and a green line will show up across the log which corresponds to a specific depth.  The image saved from that depth will display if the OIP Image Display graph is shown.  In Figure 2 the depth of the displayed saved image is 24.20ft, it is a UV image with the actual image being displayed in the "captured" image section.  The "analyzed" image indicates which pixels whithin the image display fluorescent color consitent with the color expected for fuel fluorescence.  There are 2 colors that may show up in the analyzed image: red which corresponds to the darker blue colors of the image and green which corresponds to areas of high brightesteness etiher due to very low color saturation or high brightness of the image.  This is used in an attempt to isolate out possible false mineral fluorescence. The overlayed image takes both the captured image and analyzed image and overlays them so the operator can identify areas that are being counted as fluorescence.  Images are saved as the probe is moving for every 0.05ft. The red dots on the right side column of the image display graph are depths that "Still Images" were taken.  This will contain both UV and visible light still images on the OIP-UV probe.  The OIP-G probe takes images using a 520nm green laser diode and an infrared LED.

OIP Fluorescence Log with Depth Specific Image and Software Image Analysis

Figure 2: OIP Fluorescence Log with Depth Specific Image and Software Image Analysis

The OIP system software saves 20 images per foot (65 per meter), an example portion of the saved images that an OIP-UV log would contain is shown in Figure 3.  These images are saved as the OIP-UV probe is advanced into the subsurface with a typical OIP log containing hundreds of images and being a few hundred mb in size depending upon terminal log depth and amount of color present in the images.  Where there is no NAPL or residual NAPL present the images are black, where hydrocarbon NAPL is present blue fluorescence is seen within the images.

Saved images from an OIP-UV log

Figure 3: Saved images from an OIP-UV log

Example Logs


The OIHPT-UV Log in Figure 4 displays the following graphs (left to right) electrical conductivity, HPT injection pressure, OIP % image area fluorescence, depth specific saved image (captured), the software accepted area of fluorescence (analyzed) of the saved image.  The red dots on the  right side column indicate locations of still UV and visible images saved in the file.

OIHPT-UV Log

Figure 4: OIHPT-UV Log

The OIP-G log in Figure 5 was performed on a creosote site in Europe.  The OIP-G probe which induces fluorescence utilizing a 520nm green laser diode (LD) returns a fluorescence image in the orange-red color range as depicted in the analyzed image from 54.10ft in the right column of the log.  The red dots are the saved still images which are taken with the 520nm green LD and an infrared (IR) LED.

OIP-G Log

Figure 5: OIP-G Log

When the probe is stopped to add rods, still images will be captured with both available light sources in the OIP probe.  Still images can be captured at any time an operator desires by stopping the probe advancement and selecting a button in the software.  The process only takes a few seconds to complete and probe advancement can resume.  These still images provide greater image clarity and an opportunity to look at the soil and fuel under visible light.   Visible images provide the investigator an opportunity to observe soil color and texture in-situ.  Occasionally when hydrocarbon NAPL is present in a saturated sand formation NAPL globules are evident in both the UV and visible images (Figure 6).

Collocated UV and Visible Still Images

Figure 6: Collocated UV and Visible Still Images

DI Viewer is a free program downloadable from the link below which allows the user to display any of the Direct Image® log types (MIP, OIP, HPT, EC).  With this program the user can display the raw data .zip files of each saved graph of an individual log in single log view or compare them to other logs using the overlay and cross sectional view functions.  Log specific QA data is also accessible with this software which also allows one to print or export the logs data for 3D modeling or into .jpg or .png files.

> DI Viewer Download Page





Tooling & Instrumentation

Click on a section below to learn more about the tooling for OIP.

Geoprobe Systems® manufactures all of the equipment needed for OIHPT logging. This equipment can be divided into two basic categories: surface instrumentation (OIP interface, data acquisition, and HPT controller), and downhole probes (including probes, trunklines, connectors, etc.).

A basic set of OIHPT instruments is shown in Figure 7 and includes the following:

  1. OP6100 OIP Interface: This instrument regulates, controls and monitors power to the OIP power supply and sends the system control signals to the downhole tools.  Images from the down hole camera are collected by the instrumnet and relayed to the computer via a USB connection.
  2. FI6000: Data acquisition instrument, acquires depth, EC, and HPT data if avilable and relays it to the computer via a USB connection. The FI6000 is the general data acquisition instrument used in all Geoprobe® DI logging systems (EC and HPT). It also provides the electrical conductivity measurement system associated with OIP.
  3. K6300 Series HPT Controller (Optional): This instrument regulates and measures injection water flow and pressure to the OIHPT probe.  Data from this controller is sent to the FI6000 via a data cable.
OIHPT Instrumentation

Figure 7: OIHPT Instrumentation

Basic downhole OIP equipment is shown in Figure 8. There are many variations and combinations of this tooling, depending on the contaminant type, depth requirement and the lithology or permeability sensors that are to be used in combination with the OIP. The standard, most commonly deployed components are shown below:
1. OH6570 OIHPT-UV probe (MN 227466) 275nm UV and visible light sources with removable sapphire window, HPT screen and dipole electrical conductivity array.  
2. OIHPT Trunkline (MN 228254)/OIP Trunkline (MN 226362): 150 ft. (46m).
3. Connection section and drive head. Power supply (OIP-UV MN 224692, OIHPT-UV MN 228265) and electrical connections are carried in this section.
4. Probe rods. Geoprobe® 1.75-inch (44mm) and 1.5-inch (38mm) rods are the most commonly used for MIP logging.  Successive sections of these rods are added to push or percussion drive the probe to depth.
 

OIHPT Probe, Power supply (ran inside the connection tube), connection tube and drive head which connect the the drive rods.  The OIHPT trunkline connects the down-hole probe to the up-hole instruments.

Figure 8: OIHPT Probe, Power supply (ran inside the connection tube), connection tube and drive head which connect the the drive rods. The OIHPT trunkline connects the down-hole probe to the up-hole instruments.

Having HPT data along with the OIP-EC data provides the site investigator a powerful combination of logging tools.  This tool provides the ability to simultaneously estimate soil permeability with the HPT, detect NAPL fluorescence with the OIP, and measure soil/pore fluid conductance with standard EC.  The OIHPT probe and system can be operated with all sensors collecting data or it can be used to collect just HPT-EC data or just OIP-EC data depending upon project and weather considerations.

> Learn More: HPT

OIHPT-G probe utilizes a 520nm green laser diode to induce fluorescence on larger PAH contaminants such as Creosote, Coal Tars, Heavy Crude Oils and Bunker Fuels.  

OIHPT-G with a Green Light Source:

OIP-G Fluorescence Image:

This OIHPT-CPT sub allows an operator to collect HPT injection pressure, OIP fuel fluorescence, and EC lithology along with CPT tip resistance, sleeve friction and U2 pore pressure when combined with the Nova cone.  The tool can be operated without the NOVA cone by running with the thread solid point or with the NOVA cone by substituting the solid point with the NOVA cone.   The OIHPT CPT sub is available in either ultraviolet-visible or green-infrared light source models depending upon the target contaminant requirements. 

> Learn More: CPT

Used with the Geotech AB NOVA Cone

OIHPT-CPT Sub : Used with the Geotech AB NOVA Cone

 

 

Tooling & Instrumentation


OIHPT Equipment

Geoprobe Systems® manufactures all of the equipment needed for OIHPT logging. This equipment can be divided into two basic categories: surface instrumentation (OIP interface, data acquisition, and HPT controller), and downhole probes (including probes, trunklines, connectors, etc.).

A basic set of OIHPT instruments is shown in Figure 7 and includes the following:

  1. OP6100 OIP Interface: This instrument regulates, controls and monitors power to the OIP power supply and sends the system control signals to the downhole tools.  Images from the down hole camera are collected by the instrumnet and relayed to the computer via a USB connection.
  2. FI6000: Data acquisition instrument, acquires depth, EC, and HPT data if avilable and relays it to the computer via a USB connection. The FI6000 is the general data acquisition instrument used in all Geoprobe® DI logging systems (EC and HPT). It also provides the electrical conductivity measurement system associated with OIP.
  3. K6300 Series HPT Controller (Optional): This instrument regulates and measures injection water flow and pressure to the OIHPT probe.  Data from this controller is sent to the FI6000 via a data cable.
OIHPT Instrumentation

Figure 7: OIHPT Instrumentation

Basic downhole OIP equipment is shown in Figure 8. There are many variations and combinations of this tooling, depending on the contaminant type, depth requirement and the lithology or permeability sensors that are to be used in combination with the OIP. The standard, most commonly deployed components are shown below:
1. OH6570 OIHPT-UV probe (MN 227466) 275nm UV and visible light sources with removable sapphire window, HPT screen and dipole electrical conductivity array.  
2. OIHPT Trunkline (MN 228254)/OIP Trunkline (MN 226362): 150 ft. (46m).
3. Connection section and drive head. Power supply (OIP-UV MN 224692, OIHPT-UV MN 228265) and electrical connections are carried in this section.
4. Probe rods. Geoprobe® 1.75-inch (44mm) and 1.5-inch (38mm) rods are the most commonly used for MIP logging.  Successive sections of these rods are added to push or percussion drive the probe to depth.
 

OIHPT Probe, Power supply (ran inside the connection tube), connection tube and drive head which connect the the drive rods.  The OIHPT trunkline connects the down-hole probe to the up-hole instruments.

Figure 8: OIHPT Probe, Power supply (ran inside the connection tube), connection tube and drive head which connect the the drive rods. The OIHPT trunkline connects the down-hole probe to the up-hole instruments.

Having HPT data along with the OIP-EC data provides the site investigator a powerful combination of logging tools.  This tool provides the ability to simultaneously estimate soil permeability with the HPT, detect NAPL fluorescence with the OIP, and measure soil/pore fluid conductance with standard EC.  The OIHPT probe and system can be operated with all sensors collecting data or it can be used to collect just HPT-EC data or just OIP-EC data depending upon project and weather considerations.

> Learn More: HPT

OIHPT-G

OIHPT-G probe utilizes a 520nm green laser diode to induce fluorescence on larger PAH contaminants such as Creosote, Coal Tars, Heavy Crude Oils and Bunker Fuels.  

OIHPT-G with a Green Light Source:

OIP-G Fluorescence Image:

OIHPT-CPT

This OIHPT-CPT sub allows an operator to collect HPT injection pressure, OIP fuel fluorescence, and EC lithology along with CPT tip resistance, sleeve friction and U2 pore pressure when combined with the Nova cone.  The tool can be operated without the NOVA cone by running with the thread solid point or with the NOVA cone by substituting the solid point with the NOVA cone.   The OIHPT CPT sub is available in either ultraviolet-visible or green-infrared light source models depending upon the target contaminant requirements. 

> Learn More: CPT

Used with the Geotech AB NOVA Cone

OIHPT-CPT Sub : Used with the Geotech AB NOVA Cone

 

 

Videos



Resources

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Brooklyn, Michigan OIP Report

Literature Type: Technical Documents
Download File: File Brooklyn MI OIP Report.pdf





OIP SOP V.2.0

Literature Type: Technical Documents
Download File: File OIP SOP rev.2.pdf



OIP Log

OIP Log

OIP Logging in Belgium

OIP Logging in Belgium

OIP Logging in New York

OIP Logging in New York

OIHPT Instruments and Probe

OIHPT Instruments and Probe

OIHPT Log

OIHPT Log

UV Image of NAPL

UV Image of NAPL

OIHPT Logging in Alaska

OIHPT Logging in Alaska

Visible Image of Soil

Visible Image of Soil

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